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Athabasca University

Paul Huebener

Associate Professor, English

Contact

I am on sabbatical until August 29th, 2022, during which time I will be conducting research on critical sleep studies. For questions about my courses, please contact the Acting Coordinator, Dr. Romita Choudhury. If you need to contact me for a different reason, please allow more time than usual for a response. Many thanks!

Education

  • Ph.D. McMaster University
  • M.A. - McMaster University
  • B.A. - University of British Columbia

Biography

Paul Huebener is an Associate Professor of English in the Centre for Humanities. He holds a Ph.D. from the Department of English and Cultural Studies at McMaster University and completed a SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Calgary. He has been with AU since 2015, and he teaches the courses listed on this page.

Paul’s research asks how time functions culturally as a form of power, revealing how literature and other imaginative responses can help us develop a critical literacy of time. His latest book is Nature’s Broken Clocks: Reimagining Time in the Face of the Environmental Crisis. Moving from circadian rhythms and ancient frozen bacteria to advertisements and oil pipelines, the book turns to literature to show how cultural narratives of time are connected to the problems of ecological collapse and what we might do to fix them.

Paul’s previous book, Timing Canada: The Shifting Politics of Time in Canadian Literary Culture, develops foundational principles of critical time studies, demonstrating how time functions broadly as a tool of power, privilege, and imagination within a multicultural and multi-temporal nation. Timing Canada was a finalist for the Gabrielle Roy Prize.

Paul has previously served as a Steering Committee member for the Time and Globalization Working Project based at McMaster University and as a co-editor for The Goose: A Journal of Arts, Environment, and Culture in Canada.

Selected Publications

Books:

Nature’s Broken Clocks has been reviewed in the Literary Review of Canada and has been featured on CBC Radio in a dedicated review and as part of a pandemic reading list. Paul has also delivered an online book talk at The Greenhouse, published a featured research article, “Time as Power: Climate Crisis and COVID-19 Require us to Reimagine Time,” and given an interview with the Carleton University School of Journalism and Communication. Nature's Broken Clocks was named a finalist for the 2021 Creative Saskatchewan Publishing Award.

Natures Broken Clock

Timing Canada: The Shifting Politics of Time in Canadian Literary Culture. McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2015. Finalist for the Gabrielle Roy Prize in Canadian literary criticism.

Timing Canada

Co-Edited Books

Time and Globalization: An Interdisciplinary Dialogue. Reprint of the special issue of Globalizations on “Time and Globalization.” Edited by Paul Huebener, Susie O’Brien, Tony Porter, Liam Stockdale, and Yanqiu Rachel Zhou. Routledge, 2017.

Timing Canada

Time, Globalization and Human Experience. Edited by Paul Huebener, Susie O’Brien, Tony Porter, Liam Stockdale, and Yanqiu Rachel Zhou., Routledge, 2017.

Timing Canada

Co-Edited Special Journal Issue:

Time and Globalization, special issue of Globalizations, edited and introduced by Paul Huebener, Susie O’Brien, Tony Porter, Liam Stockdale, and Yanqiu Rachel Zhou, vol. 13, no. 3, 2016,
www.tandfonline.com/toc/rglo20/13/3?nav=tocList.

Selected Refereed Book Chapters:

“‘The clock’s wound up’: Critical Reading Practices in the Time of Social Acceleration and Ecological Collapse.” On Active Grounds: Agency and Time in the Environmental Humanities, edited by Robert Boschman and Mario Trono, Wilfrid Laurier University Press, 2019, pp. 33-55.

“Recognizing and Resisting Animal Subjectivity in Timothy Findley’s The Wars.” Animals and War: Studies of Europe and North America, edited by Ryan Hediger, Brill, 2013, pp. 177-95.

Selected Refereed Articles:

”Stealing Sleep: Expanding the Conversation on the Literary Politics of Sleep and Insomnia.“ English Studies in Canada, vol. 44, no. 3, 2018 [actually published in 2021], pp. 67-89, muse.jhu.edu/article/783656.

”Timely Ecocriticism: Reading Time Critically in the Environmental Humanities.“ Environmental Literatures and Politics in Canada, special issue of ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment, edited by Catriona Sandilands, vol. 25, no. 2, 2018, pp. 327-44,
academic.oup.com/isle/article/25/2/327/5052175.

Edited with, and introduction written with, Susie O’Brien, Tony Porter, Liam Stockdale, and Y. Rachel Zhou. “Reworking Resilience.” IGHC Working Paper Series, McMaster University, vol. 17, no. 1, 2017, socialsciences.mcmaster.ca/globalization/news/ighc-working-paper-series-17-1-reworking-resilience.

”Subjective Time and the Challenge of Social Synchronization: Gabrielle Roy’s The Road Past Altamont and Catherine Bush’s Minus Time.“ Canadian Literature, no. 223, 2014, pp. 32-48,
canlit.ca/article/subjective-time-and-the-challenge-of-social-synchronization-gabrielle-roys-the-road-past-alamont-and-catherine-bushs-minus-time/.

Edited with, and introduction written with, Susie O’Brien, Tony Porter, Liam Stockdale, and Y. Rachel Zhou. “An Interdisciplinary Forum on Time and Globalization.” IGHC Working Paper Series, McMaster University, vol. 12, no. 3, 2012,
globalization.mcmaster.ca/research/publications/working-papers.

“Thoughts on Time-Based Readings of Canadian Literature and Culture.” English Studies in Canada, vol. 36, no. 2-3, 2010, pp. 141-64,
journals.library.ualberta.ca/esc/index.php/ESC/article/view/11004.

“Metaphor and Madness as Postcolonial Sites in Novels by Jean Rhys and Tayeb Salih.” Mosaic, vol. 43, no. 4, 2010, pp. 19-34,
wwwapps.cc.umanitoba.ca/publications/mosaic/common/issue/get/43/4

“Dark Stories: Poet-Audience Relations and the Journey Underground in Margaret Atwood’s The Door and Other Works.” Studies in Canadian Literature, vol. 34, no. 2, 2009, pp. 106-33,
journals.lib.unb.ca/index.php/SCL/article/view/12704. Winner, Margaret Atwood Society Award for Best Article Published in a Scholarly Journal or Anthology, 2010.

“‘No Moon to Speak of’: Identity and Place in Dionne Brand’s In Another Place, Not Here.” Callaloo, Special Thirtieth Anniversary Issue, vol. 30, no. 2, 2007, pp. 615-25,
doi.org/10.1353/cal.2007.0211.

Selected Journal Issue Introductions:

With Amanda Di Battista. “Responding to a Racist Climate.” The Goose: A Journal of Arts, Environment, and Culture in Canada, vol. 16, no. 1, 2017,
scholars.wlu.ca/thegoose/vol16/iss1/36.

With Amanda Di Battista. “The Environmental Humanities in a Post-Truth World.” The Goose: A Journal of Arts, Environment, and Culture in Canada, vol. 15, no. 2, 2017,
scholars.wlu.ca/thegoose/vol15/iss2/28/.

With Amanda Di Battista. “Editor’s Notebook.” The Goose: A Journal of Arts, Environment, and Culture in Canada, vol. 15, no. 1, 2016,
scholars.wlu.ca/thegoose/vol15/iss1/60/.

With Lisa Szabo-Jones. “Editor’s Notebook: Ten Years of The Goose.” The Goose: A Journal of Arts, Environment, and Culture in Canada, vol. 14, no. 2, 2016,
scholars.wlu.ca/thegoose/vol14/iss2/59/.

Selected Creative Nonfiction:

“Notes Toward the World’s Slowest To-Do List.” filling Station, no. 59, 2014, pp. 46-49. Also published as a condensed version in audio form at
www.fillingstation.ca/news/2014/8/7/a-reading-from-paul-huebener.

“Daily Bread in the Savannah Rainforest.” ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment, vol. 17, no. 1, 2010, pp. 167-77,
doi.org/10.1093/isle/isp148.

“The Teeming Abyss: Weaving through the Pemón Amazon.” Essay with original photography. Terrain.org, no. 22, 2008,
www.terrain.org/essays/22/huebener.htm.

Updated January 19 2021 by Student & Academic Services

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